Sherry Lewkowicz

Director of Certification / Faculty, The Writing Revolution

Session

The Writing Revolution

Writing is the most difficult thing we ask students to do—and for too long, we’ve assumed students will just “pick it up.” But only 25% of American students can write proficiently, and the percentage is far lower for those students who are low-income, minority, English Language Learners or students with special needs. Most students need a logical sequence of writing activities that are embedded in the content of the curriculum and that break down the complex task of writing into manageable
chunks. That kind of writing instruction builds students’ writing skills and content knowledge at the same time. Our organization, The Writing Revolution, trains and supports teachers and school leaders in implementing The Hochman Method, an explicit set of evidence-based strategies for teaching writing. Our approach builds from sentences to compositions and is embedded in curriculum across all content areas and grade levels. At this session, we’ll provide an overview of the
method, a look at some of the specific strategies we teach, and a summary of the research base that informs this approach.

Bio

Sherry Lewkowicz joined The Writing Revolution in 2016. She previously taught English and Advanced Placement Literature for eight years at an international school in which most students were low-income and about half were English Language Learners. Additionally, she taught playwriting and coordinated her school’s arts programming. Sherry first discovered her passion for helping students improve their writing as an undergraduate Writing Fellow at Brown University, where she later earned her Masters in Teaching. She has a background in journalism, having written for the education website Chalkbeat.org and The Star Ledger.

Twitter: @SherryLewkow @TheWritingRevol

Website: http://www.thewritingrevolution.org/

Archive

Advancing Thinking Through Writing: How to Build and Deepen Students’ Content Knowledge

Writing is the most difficult thing we ask students to do—and for too long, we’ve assumed students will just “pick it up.” But only 25% of American students can write proficiently, and the percentage is far lower for those students who are low-income, minority, English Language Learners or students with special needs. Most students need a logical sequence of writing activities that are embedded in the content of the curriculum and that break down the complex task of writing into manageable chunks. That kind of writing instruction builds students’ writing skills and content knowledge at the same time. Our organization, The Writing Revolution, trains and supports teachers and school leaders in implementing The Hochman Method, an explicit set of evidence-based strategies for teaching writing. Our approach builds from sentences to compositions and is embedded in curriculum across all content areas and grade levels. At this session, we’ll provide an overview of the method, a look at some of the specific strategies we teach, and a summary of the research base that informs this approach.

The Writing Revolution

Writing is the most difficult thing we ask students to do—and for too long, we’ve assumed students will just “pick it up.” But only 25% of American students can write proficiently, and the percentage is far lower for those students who are low-income, minority, English Language Learners or students with special needs. Most students need a logical sequence of writing activities that are embedded in the content of the curriculum and that break down the complex task of writing into manageable
chunks. That kind of writing instruction builds students’ writing skills and content knowledge at the same time. Our organization, The Writing Revolution, trains and supports teachers and school leaders in implementing The Hochman Method, an explicit set of evidence-based strategies for teaching writing. Our approach builds from sentences to compositions and is embedded in curriculum across all content areas and grade levels. At this session, we’ll provide an overview of the
method, a look at some of the specific strategies we teach, and a summary of the research base that informs this approach.