Sarah Donarski

Teacher of English; MSc University of Oxford, Wellington College
Speaking at

Session

Say it or Sign it? Is Verbal Feedback really better than Marking?

Research has found that marking is one of the most time-consuming responsibilities of being a teacher. Many schools have tried to make allowances for this by establishing shorthand or universal marking policies or, in the case of a school recently, eliminating written feedback entirely. But does verbal feedback give the same results? Can it be tracked as effectively? This session evaluates the ‘dos and donts’ of written and verbal feedback, encouraging teachers and schools to be considerate of whether written or verbal feedback is better for formative or summative assessments. It provides an exploration of research where both written and verbal feedback methods have been successful, and looks at closely at why. Say it or Sign it? is suitable for all teachers who wish to develop a better understanding on how to use either written or verbal feedback to strengthen their students’ motivation, direction and results. The session also provides the opportunity for teachers and schools to consider their own policies, and how their time spent providing feedback can be used more efficiently.

Bio

Sarah was educated in Australia where she initially completed her Diploma of Education post B.A. Arts (English/Philosophy). She moved to the UK in 2013 and completed a PGCE alongside teaching full time to further understand new pedagogies and the career in the UK. Having a perspective of two different education systems, as well as experience in Academy Schools, State Schools and now at Wellington College, she pulls together her experience to put forward what she believes to be the core of a good teacher: one that facilitates and inspires but does not burn out educational passion in young people for ‘academic results’ gain.

Blog: https://perspected.wordpress.com/

Archive

Say it or Sign it? Is Verbal Feedback really better than Marking?

Research has found that marking is one of the most time-consuming responsibilities of being a teacher. Many schools have tried to make allowances for this by establishing shorthand or universal marking policies or, in the case of a school recently, eliminating written feedback entirely. But does verbal feedback give the same results? Can it be tracked as effectively? This session evaluates the ‘dos and donts’ of written and verbal feedback, encouraging teachers and schools to be considerate of whether written or verbal feedback is better for formative or summative assessments. It provides an exploration of research where both written and verbal feedback methods have been successful, and looks at closely at why. Say it or Sign it? is suitable for all teachers who wish to develop a better understanding on how to use either written or verbal feedback to strengthen their students’ motivation, direction and results. The session also provides the opportunity for teachers and schools to consider their own policies, and how their time spent providing feedback can be used more efficiently.

What you do not know about Feedback and Motivation

Feedback and our students’ motivation are inextricably linked. However, the comments, remarks and discussions that we can have with our pupils about their work has the potential to greatly impact the way they perceive their ability in this subject. So what is the answer? This session explores the most effective ways we can give feedback to a variety of age groups and learners to motivate their learning in our subjects. Using recent studies on self-perception, intrinsic motivation and mindset, ‘What you do not know about Feedback and Motivation’ demonstrates how students can best learn from our feedback so that greater independence is encouraged in the classroom and students develop grit and resilience. It also provides some effective strategies that teachers can use to ensure that their pupils see feedback as a constructive comment rather than a criticism. This session is aimed at teachers newer to the profession, or those interested in how to provide more effective feedback in their classroom practice.