Lucy Crehan

International Education Consultant
Speaking at

Session

Lessons for Sweden from ‘top-performing’ education systems

Lucy will present a comparison of the Swedish education system with those in Finland, Canada, Japan, Shanghai and Singapore, highlighting both the strengths of the Swedish system alongside things it might learn from these ‘top-performing’ systems.

Bio

Lucy is an education explorer and international education consultant. She taught science at a secondary school in London before completing a Masters in Education at Cambridge. She then spent time working in schools and living with teachers in six ‘top-performing’ education systems; the basis for her book, ‘Cleverlands: the secrets behind the success of the world’s education superpowers’, one of The Economist’s ‘books of the year 2016’. On her return, Lucy wrote a book on teacher career structures for IIEP UNESCO. She now works as an independent education consultant, specializing in system-level policy.

Blog: www.lucycrehan.com

Twitter: @lucy_crehan

Archive

New York 2017

The role of culture in creating education superpowers

Many dismiss the idea of learning from countries that do well in international tests, claiming that what they do is not relevant due to their differing cultures. Lucy Crehan has spent time inside classrooms in Finland, Japan, Singapore, Shanghai and Canada, and will give her evidence-based thoughts on this contentious topic – can we learn anything for our own systems from such places, or is trying to do so a waste of time? In doing so she will cover Confucianism, teacher attraction, student selection and growth mindset to make the case that there are things we can learn from these countries after all.

Scandinavia 2017

The role of culture in education systems’ success

Many dismiss the idea of learning from countries that do well in international tests, claiming that what they do is not relevant due to their differing cultures. Lucy Crehan has spent time inside classrooms in Finland, Japan, Singapore, Shanghai and Canada, and will give her thoughts on this contentious topic – can we learn anything for our own systems from such places, or is trying to do so a waste of time?