Kris Boulton

Director of Education
Speaking at

Session

The best way to teach in the world? The evidence for Direct Instruction.

10 years ago, John Hattie released a super-synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses from research in education.
On direct instruction, he said this:

“Every year I present lectures to teacher education students and find that they are already indoctrinated with the mantra ‘constructivism good, direct instruction bad.’ When I show them the results of these meta-analyses, they are stunned, and they often become angry at having been given an agreed set of truths and commandments against direct instruction.”

So, what is direct instruction, why is it vilified, and why are Hattie’s students so angry when they learn what the evidence has to say?

As well as answering these questions, this session will show you where to go to learn more, and how to apply this powerful, research driven, approach to teaching in your own classroom.

Bio

Kris Boulton spent five years working as a maths teacher in inner-city schools, including the game- changing King Solomon Academy. He blogs and writes for the TES, and his interest in teacher education stems from the belief that it’s one of the biggest levers we have for school improvement. He currently works at Up Learn, an online platform that uses cognitive science and AI to build A Level revision courses that guarantee students an A or A*, or their money back.

Archive

The best way to teach in the world? The evidence for Direct Instruction.

10 years ago, John Hattie released a super-synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses from research in education.

On direct instruction, he said this:

“Every year I present lectures to teacher education students and find that they are already indoctrinated with the mantra ‘constructivism good, direct instruction bad.’ When I show them the results of these meta-analyses, they are stunned, and they often become angry at having been given an agreed set of truths and commandments against direct instruction.”

So, what is direct instruction, why is it vilified, and why are Hattie’s students so angry when they learn what the evidence has to say?

As well as answering these questions, this session will show you where to go to learn more, and how to apply this powerful, research driven, approach to teaching in your own classroom.

Unstoppable Learning: Working towards a research-driven theory of instruction
‘Teaching’ has become a word so muddied that as far back as 1971 Paul Hirst had to distinguish between ‘teaching activities’ and ‘teaching as an enterprise.’ This is a session about teaching activity: starting with the premise that every child is capable of learning what we aim to teach them, how can we use research to guarantee 100% success, 100% of the time. If we believe it is possible to construct a programme of Unstoppable Learning, this is a session about how to do it.

Teaching Teachers – A silly idea?

Today, the idea that teachers are not merely born, but can be made, is a forgone conclusion. Yet, while universal education is a century old, and teaching per se many centuries older, the serious study of teacher education stretches back only a little over fifty years, and has undergone many iterations in that time.

In this session Kris Boulton will shed light on the history of research into teacher education, review where we are at the moment, and take a look at where we might go next.