John Mighton

Founder, JUMP Math
Event

Session

Session 1

Extreme equality: How to use motivational research to close the achievement gap in math

Wide differences in achievement among students appear to be natural in mathematics: by the time students enter high school, many will have fallen behind or developed negative attitudes about math. New research in cognitive science suggests that students’ attitudes play a key role in learning: students who believe that they are not talented or that the teacher has low expectations of them are far less likely to learn than students who have positive mindsets. In this talk I will demonstrate a method of teaching called guided discovery that reduces visible academic hierarchies and helps students’ brains work efficiently by motivating them to work harder and engage more deeply in lessons. In a randomized controlled trial, students who were taught by this method learned significantly more than students in the control group.

Session 2

Problem solving for every student

Participants will see an overview of research on the importance of scaffolding and continuous assessment in problem solving. By using well-scaffolded and incrementally harder sequences of exercises combined with continuous assessment and student explanation, teachers can nurture mathematical problem solving abilities in all students. Discussion will focus on how to create a sequence of problems where only one or two strategies are needed to solve the problems and where very few elements of the problem vary at each point in the sequence. This incremental approach avoids “cognitive overload” and helps all students develop the skills and positive mindsets they need to tackle more complex problems.

Bio

John Mighton is a mathematician and playwright and is the founder of JUMP Math, a charity dedicated to improving the teaching of math. John has given keynotes at many conferences on cognitive science and education, including the Aspen Brian Forum. He is the recipient of the Ryerson Award for service to public education and the Schwab Award for Social Entrepreneur of the Year.

Blog: http://jumpmath.org

Archive

Toronto 2017

Extreme equality: Using evidence based methods to close the achievement gap in math

JUMP Math was recently listed on the Evidence for ESSA website, after producing strong results in a randomized controlled trial. I will give examples of the of methods of teaching used in JUMP and connect them to research in cognitive science. I will also talk about JUMP pilots in NY: using JUMP resources, the Manhattan Charter school got the greatest gains on their state tests of all schools in NYC.

New York 2017

Extreme equality: Using evidence based methods to close the achievement gap in math

JUMP Math was recently listed on the Evidence for ESSA website, after producing strong results in a randomized controlled trial. I will give examples of the of methods of teaching used in JUMP and connect them to research in cognitive science. I will also talk about JUMP pilots in NY: using JUMP resources, the Manhattan Charter school got the greatest gains on their state tests of all schools in NYC.

Washington 2016

Extreme Equality: Using research to close the achievement gap in math 

JUMP Math is a Common Core aligned K to 8 math program based on teaching method called “guided discovery.”. Various pilots and studies have shown promising results: in a matched pair study by Johns Hopkins the Manhattan Charter school got the greatest gains on their state test scores of all schools in NY city.  Dr. Mighton will demonstrate methods teachers can use to empower their student to make discoveries on their own while still providing a great deal of rigorous scaffolding, feedback and practice.