Elisabet Bellander

Lead teacher in Math and Natural Science, Universitetsholmens gymnasium, Malmö
Speaking at

Michael Blaesild

Michael Blaesild, Lead Teacher in Construction work, Byggymnasiet, Malmö. Part of the KaMa projekt

Session

Voices about mathematics in pre-vocational education: Two subject areas’ relationships to each other

In the action research project KaMa we investigated how relationships between mathematics and the educational subject of construction work in upper secondary school may be described, with a specific interest in the students’ anticipated work in the construction business and how vocational students, teachers and a researcher describe these relationships in the beginning and at the end of the project. Findings reveal that the relationships comprise substantially more than viewing mathematics as being applied in a workplace practice, but also how mathematics may explain aspects of the subject Construction work. Mathematics and Construction work, as presented in the form of a general model, should be viewed as a content area of its own, with relationships to respective subject area.

Bio

Elisabet Bellander works as a upper secondary mathematics teacher at Universitetsholmens gymnasium in Malmö where she teaches mathematics in vocational programs. Elisabet is a “förstelärare” (Lead Teacher) and runs the project KaMa (Characteristic teaching contents and Mathematics) with Michael Blaesild.

Website: http://kamatte.blogspot.se/

Twitter: @Bellander2

Michael Blaesild works as a construction work teacher in the upper secondary school Byggymnasiet in Malmö. Michael is also a Lead Teacher and runs the project KaMa with Elisabet Bellander.

Website: http://kamatte.blogspot.nl

Archive

Voices about mathematics in pre-vocational education: Two subject areas’ relationships to each other

In the action research project KaMa we investigated how relationships between mathematics and the educational subject of construction work in upper secondary school may be described, with a specific interest in the students’ anticipated work in the construction business and how vocational students, teachers and a researcher describe these relationships in the beginning and at the end of the project. Findings reveal that the relationships comprise substantially more than viewing mathematics as being applied in a workplace practice, but also how mathematics may explain aspects of the subject Construction work. Mathematics and Construction work, as presented in the form of a general model, should be viewed as a content area of its own, with relationships to respective subject area.