Deep Ghataura

Physics and maths teacher, Heston Community School
Speaking at

Session

Fundamental measurement for schools and departments

“Fundamental measurement is something that has passed UK schools by. We’ve been fed a diet of the meaninglessness of progress but I think that this is prematurely pessimistic. I will introduce item-response theory for schools and show that we can make defensible claims of progress.

The session aims for heads of department and normal classroom teachers to be introduced to ways of linking assessments, reporting assessment data and making defensible claims from the scores”

Bio

Deep Ghataura is in his sixth year of teaching after finishing his PGCE. Currently Deep is a physics and maths teacher at Heston Community School. Previously, Deep was a curriculum designer at The Crest Academy having also taught computer science at Cottenham Village College for two years. For the 2016-2017 year Deep went to do a Postgraduate Certificate in Educational Assessment and Examinations with the Cambridge Assessment Network. Deep is also a co-founder of the #cogscisci (Cognitive Science in Science Education) group. Deep has written articles for the Chartered College of Teaching’s journal and Cambridge Assessment’s Achieve magazine.

Archive

National Conference 2018

Measurement for schools and departments: Can we really measure progress?

Fundamental measurement is something that has passed UK schools by. We’ve been fed a diet of the meaninglessness of progress but I think that this is prematurely pessimistic. I will introduce item-response theory for schools and show that we can make defensible claims of progress. NoMoreMarking’s comparative judgement engine will be placed, for the first time in a teacher-audience session, in its true theoretical home.

The session aims for MAT CEOs, heads of department and normal classroom teachers to be introduced to ways of linking assessments, reporting assessment data and making defensible claims from the scores.

National Conference 2017

The most fundamental testing concept — validity: unpacked for teachers

Validity is probably the most fundamental testing concept for classroom teachers to understand. However, with over a 100 years of research and debate the concept can seem murky. This session aims to unpack the concept of validity and give genuinely useful insights to take back to the classroom, staffroom, and trust-wide offices. This session is useful to those wanting a deeper and richer understanding of assessment.
This session will explore five periods during the last 100 years and by taking an historical approach will tackle two key questions:
1. what does it mean to make a validity claim?
2. what evidence do you need to make one?